Sweet Leaf

Finding Beauty through Baking ~by Susan Baxter-Peace

Bittersweet Chocolate Tart ~ Sophisticated, Succulent and Simple! April 16, 2012

Having taken the Indulgences class at King Arthur Flour (about which I posted last week) just before Easter, I thought I would use the momentum to make one of the recipes as dessert for Easter dinner with my family. And with all the hype about chocolate at Easter, I thought the best choice would be the Bittersweet Chocolate Tart. It is pretty easy to make, but a rich and impressive finish for a special meal. Basically, it’s like a dark chocolate truffle in a shortbread crust.

Here is the recipe, which can be found in Sarah Copeland’s cookbook, The Newlywed Cookbook, and can also be found on her blogpost from February 1, 2012 at www.edibleliving.com.

Bittersweet Chocolate Tart wtih Smoked Sea Salt

Crust:

  • ½ c. unsalted butter, melted
  • 3 Tbsp sugar
  • ½ tsp pure vanilla extract
  • pinch of fine sea salt
  • 1 c. all purpose flour

Filling:

  • ½ c. heavy cream
  • ½ c. whole milk
  • 2 Tbsp sugar
  • pinch of fine sea salt
  • 200 g high quality bittersweet chocolate, chopped
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  1. Preheat oven to 350ºF
  2. Make the crust: Whisk together melted butter, sugar, vanilla, and salt. Add flour and stir until it feels like a damp sand. Press dough evenly along bottom and up sides of 8-inch square or 9-inch round tart pan (with removable bottom). Use wax paper or buttered fingers to even out and press the dough tightly into corners. Prick crust all over with a fork and chill in fridge until ready to bake, about 30 min.
  3. Once chilled, set pan on a baking sheet and bake until golden brown, about 25 min.
  4. Make the filling: While crust bakes, bring cream, milk, sugar and salt to a simmer in a medium saucepan over low heat. Remove from heat and add chocolate. Let it sit for about 2 minutes without stirring. Then, starting in the middle of the pan, whisk together until the chocolate is evenly melted and the mixture is a smooth and shiny dark brown.
  5. Whisk beaten egg into the chocolate filling and pour filling directly into hot crust. Decrease oven to 300ºF and return tart to oven, baking until filling is set, but still a little wiggly in the center, about 15 min.
  6. Remove and cool the tart completely on a rack at room temperature. Just before it cools and sets completely, sprinkle a few large flakes of smoked sea salt on the surface (or can be left plain).
  7. Remove the tart from the pan sides and carefully transfer to a platter before serving.

We had been travelling around the holiday, and I forgot to bring my tart pan with the removable bottom, so I ended up just using a foil pan lined with parchment paper, and the tart came out just fine for serving. Also, I baked it a bit too long, so it was more firm than it was supposed to be – more like a dense truffle filling than a melt-in-your-mouth custard – but it still tasted amazing. This could also be because I had made it the day before the dinner, and refrigerated it overnight, which probably made it set more firmly than it would have if just left at room temperature. I will, without a doubt, be making this recipe again, so I will have plenty of chances to redeem myself, and enjoy a lot of good chocolate along the way!

  • Please note: In last week’s post I had several links to various webpages. They were not properly linked, but have now been corrected and should work without trouble. I apologize for any inconvenience.
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One Response to “Bittersweet Chocolate Tart ~ Sophisticated, Succulent and Simple!”

  1. Brava Susan, I love your square version! Simply gorgeous!


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